PROJECT PONTIAC 455, PART 2

 

Build, text and photos by Mike Mavrigian

  .     I realize it’s been a while since my last posting of this project’s Part 1 article, but I’ve been tied up with multiple projects at the same time. Since the Part 1 article, I’ve obtained the crankshaft, had the heads finish-machined and assembled and just recently performed a bottom-end test-fit/mockup. Following are the results.    

MY CRANKSHAFT

The crank of choice for this build is a forged steel stroker made by Ohio Crankshaft. I’ll admit that this was my first experience with Ohio Crank, which proved to be a real eye-opener. This crank (an off-the-shelf unit, not a one-off custom) is a true work of art. Thanks to the advantages of today’s CNC machining capabilities and Ohio Crank’s obvious attention to detail, this crank is as perfect as any I’ve ever handled. Every dimension (and I do mean every dimension) is precisely dead-on to their specs. This forged 4340 steel crank features OE-spec 3.25” main journals (to fit the larger-main 455 block), with 2.200” rod journals and a 4.500” stroke. The 2.200” rod journals are smaller in diameter than the OE journals. This allows you to use big-block Chevy rods and rod bearings, which helps to reduce mass and cut cost (Chevy stuff is more plentiful and fairly economical). And because you’re dealing with components designed for a common Chevy engine, you have a wider availability range of rod bearing thickness and connecting rod center-to-center lengths.  


The Ohio Crankshaft crank is a 4340 forged steel unit, boasting a 4.500" stroke. Mains are OE 3.250", but the rod journals are 2.200" to allow the use of bigblock Chevy rods and rod bearings.

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Each main and rod journal measured exactly at spec. Fillets are precisely radiused and all oil holes are neatly chamfered. Journal surfaces are beautifully polished. Ohio Crank definitely did a nice job on this big boy.

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Ohio Crankshaft conveniently laser-marks the front counterweight. The part number indicates 455 (Pontiac 455 main journals), 4500 (indicating a 4.500" stroke) and 2200, indicating that the rod journals are 2.200" in diameter. The crank is clearly identified as an internal balance. 4340 indicates the grade of steel forging.

  . OUR CRANK SPECS Manufacturer………………….Ohio Crankshaft Part no. ……………………..…..44554500P Construction…………………...4340 forged Main journal diameter…………3.250” Rod journal diameter…………..2.200” Stroke………………….......……….4.500”      

TEST FITTING

This was by far one of the easiest, hassle-free stroker test-fits I’ve ever done. Measuring installed main bearing I.D. and crank journal diameters, I determined 0.0032” oil clearance on all main bearing locations. This will be acceptable for street performance use (if this was a dedicated race engine, I'd opt for a bit more clearance). Next, the main caps were removed and the Clevite MS-667P main bearings were coated with Royal Purple Max Tuff assembly lube to the bearings faces (and to the No. 4 thrust bearing faces). The crank is a heavy bugger, so extreme care is needed to carefully place the crank onto the saddles. The caps were placed into position (I’m re-using the OE No. 1 and No. 5 caps along with new billet steel Pro-Gram Engineering 4-bolt No. 2, 3 and 4 caps). ARP main studs were re-installed (the same studs used during main cap boring/honing). Lower stud threads, washers and nuts were coated with ARP moly. Caps were lightly tapped into position, followed by tightening all nuts to an initial 10 ft-lbs. I then tightened to 25 ft-lbs, followed by 50 ft-lbs, with final tightening to 100 ft-lbs on cap numbers 1 through 4 (these are ½”-diameter studs) and 140 ft-lbs on cap number 5 (cap 5 features 9/16”-diameter studs). Once all caps were fully tightened, I performed a rolling-resistance check, with the crank rolling with an applied force of about a mere 2-3 ft-lb (mostly due to the sticky nature of the lube). With rod bearings in place on the rods, I torqued the rod bolts (on my GearHead rod vise that's mounted to my Lista workbench) and measured bearing I.D. and crank rod journal diameters, noting rod bearing oil clearance of 0.003”. I then performed a crank endplay check (moving the crank fore/aft in its bore). I measured precisely 0.005” (spec is 0.003” – 0.009”).     .


In lieu of main bolts, I opted for ARP main studs. Caps 1-4 require 1/2" diameter, while cap 5 takes 9/16" diameter fasteners. Each stud tip features a female hex to accommodate installation and removal.

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Main caps 2, 3 and 4 were replaced with steel billet 4-bolt caps from Pro-Gram Engineering. The number 4 cap features the thrust bearing location. As you may recall from my Part 1 article, these caps are supplied slightly undersized to allow precise honing to size. Ross's Tony Lombardi align-bored and honed all of our caps to size and finish-machined number 4 cap's thrust reliefs.

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Crank endplay checked out at exactly 0.005". The OE spec ranges from 0.003" to 0.009".

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The tightest clearance found on the entire bottom end was between the front crank counterweight and the left front of the block. The tightest gap here measured  0.063"-0.064", which simply isn't a problem. Note: the large diameter hole seen here on the pan rail is simply a blind registration hole that was used at the OE factory during block machining.

.   I carefully rolled the crank to check for any possible block interference (counterweights to block pan rails and webs). To my delight, everything cleared by a mile. The tightest clearance presented at the front half of the front counterweight to the left front corner area of the block (adjacent to an OE production indexing blind hole in the pan rail), which measured 0.064”. This isn’t close enough to warrant any concern, since between bearing oil clearance and potential thermal expansion, there’s no way that this 0.064” gap will close up enough to result in interference. All other counterweight to block clearances ranged in the 0.200” to 0.340”. Luckily, the OE 455 block is nice and wide, and interference simply wasn’t an issue. I also temporarily installed the Crane hydraulic roller cam to check for counterweight to cam lobe clearance. With the crank and cam positions adjusted to even the tightest (timed and un-timed) positions, the tightest clearance was about 0.400”, so there’s no concern in this regard.   I then assembled rods and pistons (without rings), mounting my Scat forged rods (6.700” length, P/N 2-454-6700-2200) to my JE custom forged/CNC-machined pistons. After installing Clevite CB-743 HN rod bearings to the rod saddles and caps, I installed the rod/piston assemblies to the crank. The ARP 8740 7/16” rod bolts, per Scat specs, call for a torque value of 63 ft-lb, or tightening to achieve a 0.005” bolt stretch. For purposes of my initial test fitting to check for rod clearance to the block, I initially snugged the rod bolts to only 25 ft-lb. I started by temp-installing No. 1 and No. 2 rods/pistons (on No. 1 shared rod journal), rolling the crank and checking rod bolt to block clearance, crank weight to piston boss clearance and rod to cam clearances. During careful crank rotation, I was elated to discover that there was no need to perform any block clearancing. The tightest rod bolt to block distance measured at about 0.240”. The tightest counterweight to piston boss clearance was about 0.230”. Rod to cam lobe clearances were about 0.450” or so. In other words, everything cleared by a country mile.  This is the first stroker engine I’ve ever done that required no additional block clearancing whatsoever. What a delight! Admittedly, I enjoy spending time carefully grinding away to create required clearances, so while this build eliminated some of my fun-factor, I’m sure that my die grinders appreciated the break.   .


The custom-order JE forged pistons feature a CD (compression distance, from the pin centerline to dome) of 1.260". In combo with our 4.500" stroke, 6.700" rods and our block's final 10.210" deck height, this resulted in exactly zero deck (piston top to block deck). Distance from the top ring land to the dome flat is 0.220".

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The Scat forged steel connecting rods (actually bigblock Chevy application) feature a center-to-center length of precisely 6.700". The crankshaft features a 2.200" rod journal diameter to allow the use of these rods.

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Our Scat rods feature ARP 8740 rod bolts. The bolts are 7/16" diameter and feature a 1.600" length. These bolts are specified by Scat to be torqued to 63 ft-lb, or tightened at 0.005" stretch. During my final assembly, I'll use the bolt stretch-monitoring method to tighten the rod bolts, in order to achieve optimum clamping load.

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Our Mahle-Clevite main bearings are stamped for upper and lower positions (thrust bearing not marked...upper/lower interchangeable).

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Number 5 main bearing is exceptionally wide, so there's no mistaking it for another saddle location.

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Number 4 main features the thrust bearing. When applying lube to the bearing face, be sure to also lube the thrust surfaces.

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Upper main bearings in place. Remember to clean and dry the saddles and rear of bearings prior to installation. Only apply assembly lube or oil to the bearing faces after installation. Location-critical bearings are marked (upper/lower). For inexperienced DIY builders: Just remember that the upper bearings feature oil holes, which mate to the block saddles. Bearings marked "lower" install to the rod caps.

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Whenever test-fitting a stroker setup, it's a good idea to temporarily install the camshaft of choice to check for possible interference with a stroker crank or rods. During this test-fit, our clearances were in the "yardstick" range, with more than enough clearance from front to rear.

   

TESTAMENT TO AFTERMARKET PRECISION

During this mock-up test fit, I also checked piston-to-block-deck position of each piston. Each flat-top JE piston (at TDC) was exactly at zero deck (piston dome flush with block deck). In theory, this is what I should have, but reality often results in slight variation due to potential stack-up of component tolerances. In this case, theory actually met the real-world. Ross Racing Engines’ Tony Lombardi align bored and align honed the main bores, and then cut the block decks to precisely 10.210” (the Pontiac design spec). The crank was ordered as a 4.500” stroker, rods were ordered at 6.700” length, and pistons were ordered with a compression distance of 1.260”. When you add ½ crank stroke (2.250”) plus rod length (6.700”), plus piston CD (1.260”), this should equal a total of 10.210”. In this case, it’s obvious that each component was precision-manufactured to exactly those dimensions. As a result, the piston domes precisely located at zero-deck at top-dead-center. This is a great example of how precise some of today’s aftermarket manufacturers are able to produce their components. This is a good example of what you can expect when you stick with quality-oriented manufacturers such as Ohio Crankshaft, Scat, JE, Mahle-Clevite and Crane Cams.  

COMPRESSION RATIO

Our assembled cylinder heads (when measured with a burette) revealed a combustion chamber volume of 81cc. I had actually expected a chamber volume of 85cc. Considering the build’s planned specs (10.210” deck height, 4.211” bore, 4.500” stroke, 1.260” CD pistons and an anticipated compressed head gasket thickness of 0.045”, the 85cc chamber volume would have provided about 11.63:1 compression ratio. However, with the existing 81cc chamber volume (with all other factors unchanged), this raises compression to about 12.09:1, which is a bit high for anticipated street/strip use. In order to lower compression to a more reasonable level, the choices include either milling the flat-top pistons or moving to a thicker head gasket. At this point, I’m leaning towards simply moving to a thicker MLS head gasket. By selecting a compressed gasket thickness of 0.080”, this would drop the compression ratio to about 11.18:1, which would be livable for street conditions, especially with the use of aluminum heads. If a 0.045” compressed gasket was retained, the pistons would need to be cut down by about 0.036” (placing the piston 0.036” below-deck in the bore) to achieve approximately the same compression ratio. Of course, I still need to mock the heads and check valve-to-piston clearance, but at this point, if valve clearance is OK, I’ll likely go with the thicker 0.080” head gaskets rather than cutting the pistons. This leaves the door open if we opt to bump compression (you can always remove metal, but it’s hard to put it back once it’s gone).      

455 COMPRESSION RATIOS

  MLS GASKET CHART   (with MLS gaskets w/4.300” bore; with pistons at zero deck; with 81cc combustion chambers; 4.211” cylinder bores; 4.500” stroke; 6.700” rod length; and 10.210” block deck height)    

GASKET COMP. THICKNESS                       CR

0.027……………………………………………....................................………..12.63 0.030…………………………………....................................…………………..12.53 0.036………………………………………....................................……………..12.35 0.040……………………………………………....................................………..12.23 0.045………………………………………………….....................................…..12.09 0.051………………………………………………......................................……..11.92 0.060……………………………………………......................................………..11.68 0.080……………………………………………......................................………..11.18 0.98……………………………………………........................................…………10.76 0.120……………………………………………..........................................……..10.30         OUR CHOICE (with 0.080”-compressed gasket)   NO. OF CYLS…………….8 BORE……………………..4.211” STROKE………………….4.500” ROD LENGTH…………...6.700” GASKET BORE………….4.300” COMP. GASKET…………0.080 BLOCK DECK HEIGHT...10.210” TOP RING DOWN……….0.220” CHAMBER VOLUME…...81cc DOME/DISH VOLUME….0 cc PISTON TO DECK……...….0.0”   TOTAL VOLUME………….1127.97 cc CYL. VOLUME…………….1027.04 cc CLEARANCE VOLUME…..  100.93 cc GASKET VOLUME………..    19.03 cc TOP RING VOLUME………       0.9  cc DECK VOLUME………..……      0 PISTON TOP LAND DIA…..     4.173” ½ STROKE………………....….     2.250” COMP. HEIGHT………...…….    1.260” CUBIC INCHES…………...…..   501.38 COMPRESSION RATIO…….  11.18:1     (FYI: changing gasket thickness by about 0.040” changes compression ratio by about 1 point. Every 0.010” change in gasket thickness accounts for about 0.250-point in compression ratio) Note: During initial planning, I mistakenly assumed that we'd end up with compression in the high 10-range. However, once all final-selected components were obtained and calculations performed, we'll actually end up with about 11.18:1 CR.       PONTIAC 455 OE SPECS Deck height…………..….……10.210” Bore…………………....…..……  4.151” Stroke……………………...……  4.210” Main journal…………………..  3.250” Main bore……………….……..  3.438” Rod length……………….…….  6.625” Rod big end…………………...  2.250” Rod small end…………………  0.980” Rocker arm ratio………………  1.5:1       BORE/STROKE COMBINATIONS AND DISPLACEMENT   CID                       BORE           STROKE 461………………..4.155……….4.250 467………………..4.181……….4.250 474………………..4.211……….4.250 496………………..4.310……….4.250 501………………..4.211……….4.500 505………………..4.350……….4.250 511………………..4.375……….4.250 525………………..4.310……….4.500 535………………..4.350……….4.500 541………………..4.375……….4.500     MY COMBINATION Block deck height………10.210 Bore dia. …………………..  4.211 Stroke……………………....  4.500 Rod length…………………  6.700 Piston CD…………….…….  1.260 Piston dome……………….. flat-top         CRANKSHAFT INFO Bear in mind that the Pontiac 400 block and Pontiac 455 block feature different main bore diameters. The 400 block accepts a main journal diameter of 3.00”, while the 455 block accommodates a 3.250” main journal. When using the 455 block, you’ll obviously need a crank with main journals sized for the larger main bore. To reduce mass, and to make connecting rods more accessible and affordable, aftermarket 455 cranks are available to accommodate bigblock Chevy rods (these cranks feature a 2.200” rod pin diameter). Since this allows you to use commonly-available BBC rods, a wide variety of rod lengths are available from which to choose. If you plan to use BBC rods, you must specify that the crank features 2.200” rod pins instead of the larger 2.250” OE rod journals.   CONNECTING RODS Since I’m using a 455 block and will use an aftermarket crank that features BBC rod journals, my rods of choice are Scat’s P/N 2-454-6700-2200 forged H-beam rods. These feature 8740 7/16” rod bolts, 6.700” center-to-center length, are designed to accommodate the BBC 2.200” rod pin, and feature a big end width of 0.992”. Wrist pin diameter is 0.990” (bushed for floating pin).    

CYLINDER HEADS

Among the several choices available (OE, Edelbrock, Winsler, Kaufman, etc.), I chose a set of Kaufman Racing’s aluminum D-port heads that are fully CNC-machined.     KAUFMAN CYLINDER HEAD SPECS D-Port CNC Chamber volume………..   85cc (our assembled heads actually measured at 81cc w/valves) Intake port volume………310cc Intake valve head dia. ….. 2.110” Exhaust valve head dia. …1.660” or 1.77” (I opted for 1.77”) Valve height…………....….. 5.110” Valve stem dia. ………...…. 11/32”   .


Our Kaufman CNC D-port heads were purchased with "raw" valve seats and guides installed.

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The raw valve seats supplied by Kaufman will accommodate 2.100" intake and up to 1.77" exhaust valves.

      I opted for Kaufman’s bare CNC heads. As purchased, seats and guides are installed, but are raw, requiring finish-machining for the valves of choice. Fully-assembled heads are also available from Kaufman. I’ll provide full details of cylinder head installation and valvetrain setup in an upcoming segment of this project series.     FINISHING THE CYLINDER HEADS I brought the Kaufman heads to Ross Racing Engines, where Tony Lombardi performed final machining and assembly. Tony honed the raw bronze guides to achieve 0.0016” oil clearance with our 11/32” valve stems (intake valves are Del West titanium and exhaust valves are Ferrea stainless steel). Intake and exhaust seats (raw seat inserts were installed at Kaufman) were cut using angles of 15 deg, 45-deg and 60-degrees (using his contour cutter) with Tony carefully equalizing all seat depths valve-to-valve and chamber-to-chamber. Tony also carefully blended the seats and bowls to eliminate any sharp edges or overhangs that would disrupt air flow. Teflon valve seals were installed to the 0.560” guides (these seals allow enough room for up to .580” lift before coil bind or hitting retainers). Naturally, whenever you’re dealing with an aluminum cylinder head, it’s necessary to install a hardened seat at the base of the valve spring, to prevent the spring from digging into the softer aluminum. You also need a locating design to prevent the spring from walking around on the head. Our choice would be to use either spring cups (featuring an O.D. lip to capture the spring’s outer diameter) or spring locators (featuring I.D. lips to register the spring I.D.). Our Comp Cams springs feature an O.D. of 1.437” and an inner-spring I.D. of 0.640”. I opted for a set of Comp Cams spring locators P/N 4771-16. Specs for these locators: inside locating shoulder type, 0.690” inside diameter of inner spring, 0.060” locator thickness, 1.550” outside diameter, 0.570” inside diameter.     .


Tony Lombardi at Ross Racing Engines sizes our valve guides.

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Tony honed our guides to provide a consistent 0.0016" oil clearance.

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Here Tony sets up his Peterson seat machine to rough-cut the seats.

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Here an exhaust seat has been roughed-in. The intake seat in the same chamber is still in raw form.

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Once seats have been roughed-in, Tony checks installed valves for depth and labels each chamber for intake and exhaust valve depth. This provides information for final-cutting to establish equal depth for each valve.

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Here each valve position is marked for depth. Tony then final-dresses each to achieve equal depths. Initial depths ranged from -0.001" to +0.005".

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Seats are cut for final profile using a contour cutter. Effective seat angles include 15, 45 and 60-degrees.

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Tony witness-marked each valve to verify proper contact.

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The Comp Cams spring locators (P/N 4771-16) feature an inside shoulder type locator to accommodate up to a 0.690" inner spring I.D. This provides us with a max-tolerable 0.050" with the spring.  Excessive spring wander will eventually wear out the guide and guide seal.

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Our spring locators feature a 0.060"-thick base.

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Comp Cams spring locators are installed prior to springs. The inner spring I.D. will center at the spring locator, while the steel locator base provides protection for the aluminum (preventing the springs from digging into the head).

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Our triple valve springs from Comp Cams feature an O.D. of 1.437" and an inner spring I.D. of 0.640".

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Our inner spring fits over the spring locator shoulder with a 0.050" clearance.

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Tony set up installed height at 1.760" (this includes the 0.050"-thick spring locators). This installed height is OK for under 0.580" lift. Coil bind would occur at 1.080". Our springs were checked at 130 lbs on the seat, and 325 lbs open pressure.

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Our Del West titanium intake valves feature a diamond-like hard coating overall, making them compatible with ductile iron seats. Also, the hardened tips don't require lash caps.

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The Del West intake valves feature radiused "beadlock" grooves, requiring specific beadlock style locks.

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Note the bead-style locking feature on this Manley 10-degree valve lock. You cannot use "traditional" square-cut locks on a beadlock style valve.

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Our exhaust valves are Ferrea stainless steel valves, featuring 1.77" heads and 5.100" overall length.

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The Ferrea exhaust valves feature single "square cut" lock grooves.

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Traditional square-cut locks for our exhaust valves. We used Comp Cams' 10-degree Super Locks.

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Our retainers are steel 10-degree units from Comp Cams. If we were building a dedicated race engine, we might opt for lighter titanium retainers, but for the street, the mass of the steel really isn't an issue, and steel retainers will last much longer from a wear standpoint. Spending extra money on titanium retainers for street use is basically good for bragging rights only.

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With valves and spring locators in place, our springs, locks and retainers are organized and ready for installation. When using two different styles of valve locks, pay attention to prevent getting them mixed up. A mis-matched valve/lock style will result in a quick failure.

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Tony installing our springs, retainers and locks. Each valve lock fit was verified after assembly.

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A volume check of our assembled chambers revealed combustion chamber volumes of 81cc, a bit less than expected. To reduce compression to a streetable level, we'll either kiss a bit off of the pistons or move to a thicker MLS head gasket. We'll decide after checking our valve to piston clearances.

  The Del West titanium intake valves feature radiused bead-lock grooves, requiring bead-lock style locks. For the intake valves, we used Manley 10-degree beadlocks, P/N 13161-8 (set of 8, since we're only using beadlocks on the intake valves). For the exhaust valves (which feature a traditional square-cut groove), we used Comp Cams 10-degree Super Locks, P/N 613-16 (set of 16 pairs, but we only needed 8 pairs for the exhaust valves). Retainers for all valves are Comp Cams 10-degree steel retainers, P/N 740-16.   OUR VALVE HARDWARE Intake valves……….Del West titanium (2.10” x 5.100 w/11/32” stem) Exhaust valves……..Ferrea stainless steel (1.77” x 5.100” w/11/32” stem) Springs…………...…..Comp Cams 995-16 (1.437” O.D., 330-lb) Intake valve beadlocks….Manley 10-deg. P/N 13161-8 Exhaust valve locks……..Comp Cams 10-deg. Super Locks P/N 613-16 Retainers……………….Comp Cams 10-deg. steel, P/N 740-16 Spring locators…………Comp Cams P/N 4771-16       Once the heads were final-assembled, Tony measured combustion chamber volume (using his burette) at 81cc.  

STAY TUNED FOR PART 3

In my next article (Part 3 of this series), I’ll discuss valve-to-piston clearance, piston ring test-fitting, cleaning and painting the block, and crankshaft balancing.            

MY PARTS LIST

  BLOCK………………………..Original Pontiac 455 (core) CRANKSHAFT……………….Ohio Crankshaft P/N 44554500P 4340 forged, with 4.500” stroke, 455 mains and BBC rod pins CONN. RODS………………….Scat forged 6.700” BBC P/N 2-454-6700-2200 STEEL CENTER MAIN CAPS..Pro-gram Engineering P/N P455C MAIN STUDS…………………ARP P/N 194-5601 HEAD STUDS…………………ARP P/N 190-4305 CYL. HEADS………………….Kaufman Racing aluminum D-port, 85cc CNC CAMSHAFT/LIFTERS………..Comp Cams hyd. Roller P/N CL51-433-9 ROCKERS……………………..Harland Sharp alum. Rollers, P/N S6001 (1.5:1) PISTONS……………………….JE forged aluminum (custom order) TIMING GEARS……………….Melling Performance P/N 40408 OIL PUMP………………………Melling Performance P/N 10540 TIMING COVER……………….EQ (EngineQuest) P/N TC400N INTAKE VALVES………………Del West titanium (custom order: 2.10” x 5.100”) EXHAUST VALVES……………Ferrea stainless steel P/N F5144 (1.77” x 5.100”) VALVE SPRINGS………………Comp Cams P/N 995-16 (330 lb, triple) RETAINERS…………………….Comp Cams 740-16 (10-deg, steel) VALVE LOCKS EXH…………..Comp Cams 613-16 (10-deg Superlocks) VALVE LOCKS INT……………Manley 13161-8 (10-deg Beadlock) VALVE SEALS…………………Comp Cams, Teflon VALVE SPRING LOCATORS…Comp Cams 4771-16 BALANCER…………………….Fluidampr P/N 650401 (6-5/8”) FLEXPLATE……………………PRW P/N 1845503 INTAKE MANIFOLD…………..Professional Products Hurricane P/N 56031 CARBURETOR…………………Holley P/N 0-82851 (850 cfm) CARB. FEED……………………Earls –8, P/N AT101286ER DISTRIBUTOR…………………MSD Pro Billet P/N 8563 SPARK PLUG WIRES………….MSD P/N 31179 LIFTER VALLEY COVER……..Kaufman Racing GASKET SET …………………...Mahle Victor FS3494J MAIN BEARINGS……………...Mahle Clevite P/N MS667P ROD BEARINGS……………….Mahle Clevite P/N CB743HN CAM BEARINGS……………….Mahle Clevite P/N SH2925 VALVE COVERS……………….PRW aluminum, satin OIL PAN…………………………TBA WATER PUMP………………….Tuff Stuff 1475NA (chrome) or PRW 1445510 ALTERNATOR…………………Tuff Stuff, P/N 7139ABULL (100A, chrome) OIL PAN STUDS……………….ARP 400-1902 INTAKE MANIFOLD BOLTS…ARP 494-2101 ROCKER STUDS………...……….ARP 100-7101 CARB STUDS………………...…..ARP400-2403 TIMING COVER BOLTS……....ARP 490-1501 FUEL PUMP BOLTS…………...ARP 490-1601 THERMOSTAT BOLTS………..ARP 490-7401 DISTRIBUTOR STUD……….…ARP 490-1701 CAMSHAFT BOLT……………..ARP 190-1001 VALVE COVER STUDS………..ARP 400-7504 FLEXPLATE BOLTS…………....ARP 200-2904 CRANK BALANCER BOLT……ARP 190-2501   ASSEMBLY CHEMICALS……….Valco, ARP, Royal Purple       .  

OUR PROJECT’S SUPPLIER DIRECTORY

  ARP, INC. 1863 Eastman Ave. Ventura, CA 93003 800-826-3045 www.arp-bolts.com     Birchwood Automotive Group 10205 Wooster Pike Rd. Creston, OH 44217 330-435-6347 www.birchwoodautomotive.com     Comp Cams 3406 Democrat Rd. Memphis, TN 38118 800-999-0853 www.compcams.com     Del West Engineering 28128 W. Livingston Ave. Valencia, CA 91355 800-990-2779 www.delwestusa.com     Earl’s Performance Plumbing Holley Performance Products P.O. Box 10360 Bowling Green, KY 42102 270-782-2900 www.holley.com     EQ (Enginequest) 2580 N. Commerce St. North Las Vegas, NV 89030-3876 800-426-8771 www.enginequest.com       Ferrea Racing Components 2600 NW 55th Ct., Suite 234 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 888-733-2505 www.ferrea.com     Fluidampr-Horschel Motorsports 180 Zoar Valley Rd. Springville, NY 14141 716-592-1000 www.fluidampr.com       Goodson Tools & Supplies 156 Galewski Dr. Winona, MN 55987 800-533-8010 www.goodson.com       Harland Sharp 19769 Progress Dr. Strongsville, OH 44149 440-238-3260 www.harlandsharp.com       Holley Performance Products P.O. Box 10360 Bowling Green, KY 42102 270-782-2900 www.holley.com     JE Pistons Inc. 15312 Connector Lane Huntington Beach, CA 92649 714-898-9763 www.jepistons.com     Kaufman Racing Equipment 22280 Temple Rd. Glenmont, OH 44628 740-599-5000 www.krepower.com       Lista International 106 Lowland St. Holliston, MA 01746 800-722-3020 www.listaintl.com       Mahle Clevite 1350 Eisenhower Place Ann Arbor, MI 48108-3282 734-975-4777 www.engineparts.com     Mac Tools 505 N. Cleveland Ave. Westerville, OH 43082 800-622-8665 www.mactools.com     MSD Ignition 1490 Henry Brennan Dr. El Paso, TX 79936-6805 915-857-5200 www.msdignition.com     Ohio Crankshaft 5453 South State Route 49 Greenville, OH 45331 800-333-7113 www.ohiocrank.com       Professional Products 12705 S. Van Ness Ave. Hawthorne, CA 90250 800-478-5441 www.professional-products.com     Pro-Gram Engineering Corp. P.O. Box 472 Barberton, OH 44203 330-745-1004 www.pro-gram.com       PRW (Performance Racing Warehouse) 193 West Orangethorpe Ave. Placentia, CA 92870 714-792-1000 www.performanceracingwarehouse.com     Ross Racing Engines 1763 N. Main St. Niles, OH 44446-1277 330-544-4466 www.rossracingengines.com     Royal Purple Ltd. One Royal Purple Lane Porter, TX 77365 888-382-6300 www.royalpurple.com     Scat Enterprises 1400 Kingsdale Ave. Redondo Beach, CA 90278-3983 310-370-5501 www.scatcrankshafts.com     Snap-On Tools 2801 80th St. Kenosha, WI 53143-5699 262-656-5200 www.snapon.com     Summit Racing P.O. Box 909 Akron, OH 44398-6177 800-230-3030 www.summitracing.com     Trick Flow Specialties 285 West Ave. Tallmadge, OH 44278 888-841-6556 www.trickflow.com     Tuff Stuff Performance Accessories 9004 Madison Ave. Cleveland, OH 44102-2715 800-331-6562 www.tuffstuffperformance.com     Valco Cincinnati CP, Inc. 411 Circle Freeway Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45246-1284 800-788-3865 www.valco-cp.com        

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