PROJECT PONTIAC 455, PART 1

WE BEGIN THE BUILD OF A BORED STROKED PONTIAC 455 TO OBTAIN 501 CID AND ABOUT 600 PONIES.
THE GOAL:TO CREATE AN IDEAL "INDIAN" POWERPLANT FOR STREET, STRIP AND STREET RODDER APPLICATIONS

Prior to block machining, the block exterior was smoothed and detailed. Not only will this ressurected Pontiac provide some ground-pounding thump, but it'll be a stunning showpiece as well.

Text, photos and build by Mike Mavrigian

Block machining by Tony Lombardi, Ross Racing Engines

I’ve finally started the Pontiac big-block project. A few parts have been on backorder, but we’re in good shape at this point, and certainly decent enough to get started on this “vintage” bad-boy.

The direction of this build is to start with an OE Pontiac 455 block, bore and stroke to 501 CID, and build an approximately-600 HP street performer. The target audience: the street/strip muscle car and/or street rodder application.

The only OE-original component being used in this build is the bare block, which I located with the help of Tony Lombardi, head machinist & builder at Ross Racing Engines of Niles, Ohio. Tony and his father, Ross, have been building a variety of engines over the years, but tend to specialize in “vintage” Buick, Olds and Pontiac powerplants. Luckily, Tony had a block lying around that was in great condition (no cracks) that had been previously overbored +0.030” for a customer who abandoned the project. Since my plan was to hog this puppy out +0.060”, this chunk of Detroit heavy-metal suited my needs perfectly.

BUILD PLAN OVERVIEW

Starting with the OE block, the plan was to bore +0.060” oversize (4.211” as compared to the OE 4.151”) and increase stroke from the original 4.210” to 4.500”, resulting in 501 CID. The valvetrain consists of a steel hydraulic roller cam and roller lifters from Comp Cams, Ferrea stainless exhaust valves, Del West Titanium intake valves, a set of aluminum Kaufman Racing D-port CNC’d heads, and a single-plane intake from Professional products, mated to a Holley 850 cfm carb. I’ll detail the rest of the components later in this first article. I smoothed out the block exterior to obtain a “show” surface finish (we’ll paint the block in the original Pontiac blue metallic), and I’ll detail the final build to produce a spiffy visual statement. Power-wise, we’re anticipating about 600 HP. From both a performance and display aspect, this resurrected beastie should produce more than a few smiles.

Deburring, smoothing and polishing the block involved many hours of tedious work. It's kinda

like hitting your fingers with a hammer....it feels so good when you stop.

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SERVICING THE BLOCK

Before bringing the block to Ross Racing Engines for machining, I spent a few days dressing the block exterior, grinding off any casting nubs, radiusing sharp edges and basically smoothing out all exterior surfaces. I used a combination of tools and methods, ranging from carbide cutting bits on a high speed die grinder, to scotchbrite abrasive pads on both straight and angled pneumatic die grinders. Any low spots (due to the irregular casting surfaces) were filled with small amounts of All-Metal body filler (this type of filler features a high aluminum content and holds up to heat very well). I basically roughed-in the block exterior prior to precision machining of the mains, bores, decks and lifter bores. Now that the block is back in my shop, I’ll finish-detail the exterior surfaces, followed by a hot-wash and application of etching primer. After test-fitting the block, I’ll once again tear down to a bare block, hot-detergent wash, and apply a finish primer. That primer coat will be wet-sanded, followed by application of color and clearcoat. Once the block is fully painted and cleared, final assembly will take place.

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Prior to align-honing the main bore, Tony Lombardi (Ross racing Engines) installed the new set

of ARP main cap studs and carefully torqued all main cap locations. Caps 1 through 4 were

tightened to 110 ft-lbs (1/2" studs), and No. 5 cap, which features 9/16" studs, was snugged to 140 ft-lbs.

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The main bore was final-honed to 3.4387". Standard bore diameter is 3.438", but Tony prefers

to provide an added bit of looseness for stroker applications.

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The thrust bearing location (No. 4 main cap) was finish-cut at Ross Racing Engines to provide a flush surface with the existing thrust face on the upper main saddle.

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Block decks were machined to achieve the OE spec of 10.210" deck height (from crank centerline to deck surface).

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Using a reamer on his Bridgeport milling machine, the lifter bores were machined oversize to accommodate press-fit bronze liner bushings. This is necessary in order to restrict the lifter bore oil feed holes, in order to safeguard the main bearings from oil starvation. Before the bronze liners are installed, each is drilled with a 0.060" oil hole. The liner is then interference-fit into the lifter bore with the reduced oil hole aligned to the block's original oil hole. Tony started by boring each lifter bore to 1.00" to allow a press-fit of the new liners.

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Bronze lifter bore liners are drilled with the smaller oil hole, press-fit into the bores, then finish-honed to size to accommodate the 0.842"-diameter hydraulic roller lifters.

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Each lifter bore sleeve was drilled with a 0.060" oil restrictor hole that aligns with the OE oil hole.

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Modifications to the old OE block were fairly straightforward. Luckily, the OE block had extra meat on the decks (OE spec is 10.210”, but my block measured 10.2545”), allowing the decks to be cut to exact OE spec.

The block featured its original main caps. However, if you plan to build any type of serious power, the center three main caps (No. 2, 3 and 4) should be changed out to steel caps. According to both Jeff Kaufman (Kaufman Racing) and Ross Racing Engines’ Tony Lombardi, there’s no real need to change the front and rear caps unless the originals were damaged. Naturally, if budget is not an issue, the best approach is to change out all five caps for aftermarket steel). I purchased a center cap set from Pro-Gram Engineering, All of the Pontiac builders I spoke with noted that Pro-Gram’s steel caps are the best out there, so this choice was a no-brainer. The caps, as delivered, are slightly undersized (by about 0.0025”) requiring align-boring and honing for your desired clearance and main bore alignment. While OE main bore diameter is specified at 3.438”, Tony cut the OE front and rear caps (to allow a fresh bore size/alignment) and final-honed our mains at 3.4387” (he likes the bore a tad looser when using a longer stroke crank).

Also, the thrust bearing is featured on the No. 4 cap. Pro-Gram raw-machines the thrust relief in this cap, requiring the final thrust bearing relief to be done on the block, after align honing. When the Pontiac blocks were machined at the factory, the caps were secured in place, with main boring and thrust-face machining performed as an assembly. As a result, you can’t simply install a “finished” replacement cap, because you’ll never match-up to the original indexing. Ross Racing installed our caps, align-bored and honed the main bore, and then fly-cut the thrust faces on the No. 4 cap flush to the thrust faces on the block saddles.

The caps were secured with new ARP main studs, with caps 1 through 4 torqued to 110 ft-lbs, and the rear cap tightened to 140 ft-lbs (cap locations 1-4 use ½” studs, while cap No. 5 uses 9.16” studs).

As mentioned earlier, Ross cut the block decks to obtain an accurate deck height of 10.210”. Lifter bores were overbored, with bronze bushings installed a finish-honed to 0.8436”, providing 0.0016” oil clearance for my Comp 0.842” lifters (0.060” oil restrictor holes were drilled into the bushing prior to installation).

Cylinder bores were overbored +0.060” and finish-honed to 4.211”. During honing, Tony installed BHJ deck plates (in order to stress the block to mimic head installation), using the same ARP head studs that will be used during final assembly. The deck plates were clamped by torquing the stud nuts to 110 ft-lbs. Tony started out with 123 honing stones, followed by 525 and then 625 stones. This was finished with 20 strokes with plateau-finish brushes.

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BHJ deck plates (torque plates) were installed to establish block stresses that will exist with installed cylinder heads. Since cylinder bore geometry can easily shift under these stresses, use of deck plates helps to establish the bores under "assembled" conditions, allowing cylinder bore honing to create a "closer to ideal" diameter consistency. This aids in superior ring sealing and reduced operating friction.

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The deck plates were snugged to 110 ft-lbs, with a used (lready compressed) head gasket in place.

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Tony at Ross Racing performed cylinder honing with three varying grades of honing stones, finishing off with 20-strokes with plateau brushes.

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Here, Tony final-hones the bushed lifter bores to size, allowing a 0.0016" oil clearance for our hydraulic roller lifters.

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PONTIAC 455 OE SPECS

Deck height…………..………10.210”

Bore…………………..………  4.151”

Stroke…………………………  4.210”

Main journal…………………..  3.250”

Main bore……………………..  3.438”

Rod length…………………….  6.625”

Rod big end…………………...  2.250”

Rod small end…………………  0.980”

Rocker arm ratio………………  1.5:1

BORE/STROKE COMBINATIONS AND DISPLACEMENT

CID                       BORE           STROKE

461………………..4.155……….4.250

467………………..4.181……….4.250

474………………..4.211……….4.250

496………………..4.310……….4.250

501………………..4.211……….4.500

505………………..4.350……….4.250

511………………..4.375……….4.250

525………………..4.310……….4.500

535………………..4.350……….4.500

541………………..4.375……….4.500

MY COMBINATION

Deck height………………..10.210

Bore dia. …………………..  4.211

Stroke……………………...  4.500

Rod length…………………  6.700

Piston CD………………….  1.260

Piston dome……………….. flat-top

LIFTER BORES

The OE lifter bores feature oil feed passages of about 0.250” in diameter. Restricting these oil holes is critical, since the OE holes are simply too large and can result in rod bearing starvation under high-RPM/high-load performance conditions. The lifter bores were bored oversize and press-fit with bronze sleeves that were drilled with 0.060” oil holes (when installed, the drilled hole in each bushing must align with the original oil hole). For racing use, this oil hole is normally established at 0.040”, while Ross Racing recommends 0.060” for street use.

CRANKSHAFT

Bear in mind that the Pontiac 400 block and Pontiac 455 block feature different main bore diameters. The 400 block accepts a main journal diameter of 3.00”, while the 455 block accommodates a 3.250” main journal. When using the 455 block, you’ll obviously need a crank with main journals sized for the larger main bore. To reduce mass, and to make connecting rods more accessible and affordable, aftermarket 455 cranks are available to accommodate bigblock Chevy rods (these cranks feature a 2.200” rod pin diameter). Since this allows you to use commonly-available BBC rods, a wide variety of rod lengths are available from which to choose. If you plan to use BBC rods, you must specify that the crank features 2.200” rod pins instead of the larger 2.250” OE rod journals.

CONNECTING RODS

Since I’m using a 455 block and will use an aftermarket crank that features BBC rod journals, my rods of choice are Scat’s P/N 2-454-6700-2200 forged H-beam rods. These feature 8740 7/16” rod bolts, 6.700” center-to-center length, are designed to accommodate the BBC 2.200” rod pin, and feature a big end width of 0.992”. Wrist pin diameter is 0.990” (bushed for floating pin).

CYLINDER HEADS

Among the several choices available (OE, Edelbrock, Winsler, Kaufman, etc.), I chose a set of Kaufman Racing’s aluminum D-port heads that are fully CNC-machined.

With my 4.211” bore, zero deck and flat-top pistons, this will result in about 10:1 compression ratio.

KAUFMAN CYLINDER HEAD SPECS

Chamber volume………..  85cc

Intake port volume………310cc

Intake valve head dia. ….. 2.110”

Exhaust valve head dia. …1.660” or 1.77”

Valve height……………..5.110”

Valve stem dia. …………. 11/32”

I opted for Kaufman’s bare heads. Seats and guides are installed, but are raw, requiring finish-machining for the valves of choice. Fully-assembled heads are also available from Kaufman. I’ll provide full details of the heads, valves, springs, spring seats, retainers and locks in an upcoming segment of this project series.

CAMSHAFT

My choice for a bumpstick is a steel hydraulic roller cam from Comp Cams (complete with roller lifters), P/N CL51-433-9. Valve lift is 0.520” intake and 0.540” exhaust. Duration (at 0.050”) is 236 degrees intake and 242 degrees exhaust. Lobe center is 110 degrees. This should provide a tasty slightly-rough idle, with an operational band from 2200-6000 RPM.

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A PREVIEW OF OUR SELECTED COMPONENTS TO DATE (JUST TO WET YOUR APPETITE)

Our pistons are forged aluminum, CNC-machined slugs from JE. Sized for our 4.211" bores, compression distance (CD) is 1.260", per my custom-order specs. In combination with a 4.500" stroke and 6.700" rod length and our finished 10.210" deck height, this provides a theoretical zero deck.

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Our JE pistons feature a flat-top dome. With our 85cc chamber Kaufman heads, our compression ratio should be a tick over 10:1.

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Due to our required short CD (distance from wrist pin centerline to piston dome), the oil ring groove is open to the wrist pin bore. In cases such as this, a support rail is provided with the ring set. The support rail is installed at the bottom of the oil ring land, to complete the needed "footprint" for the oil ring package. Piston ring widths are 1/16"/1/16" and 3/16".  Pin diameter is 0.990". Due to the floating pin design, wrist pins will be secured with double spiral locks (rings, support rails, pins and locks were provided with the piston set).

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JE's CNC machining results in an impressive degree of precision. Not only are all pistons machined exactly identical, but finished weight is always within 1 gram or less. These pistons all weighed in at 510 grams, with no need for weight correction. I'll address the balancing procedures in an upcoming article in this series.

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In order to beef up the bottom end, I'm using billet steel center main caps from Pro-Gram Engineering. The new caps are undersized by about 0.0025" to allow main bore align honing to required size. Pictured here (left to right) are caps number 2, 3 and 4. Cap number 4 features the thrust main bearing location. Pro-Gram machines a shallow "rough" cut on the thrust face. Once installed to the block, the thrust face on the front and rear of this cap is then machined flush to the existing thrust face recesses on the block's No. 4 thrust bearing saddle location.

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This view shows the thrust bearing face recess on the No. 4 cap (far right). These steel 4-bolt main caps provide far superior block and main bore rigidity than the OE caps.

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The "rough cut" recesses on the thrust bearing flange areas provide a starting point. Once installed to the block, this area is fly-cut machined, indexing off of the existing block's No. 4 thrust surface, resulting in a tailor-fit flush thrust surface shared by both the block saddle and cap thrust faces.

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Our ARP main cap stud kit. Caps 1 through 4 require 1/2" diameter fasteners, while the rear (No. 5) cap requires 9/16" fasteners. Both main cap bolts and studs are available, but I prefer studs for superior clamping consistency.

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Our ARP head stud kit (all 1/2" diameter). I'll detail stud installation during the test and final assembly articles, but it's important to know that you must NEVER install studs too tightly. In the case of this build, for example, the torque spec for heads is 110 ft-lbs. That means that whe using studs, the NUTS are tightened to 110 ft-lbs, not the studs into the block. Opinions vary, but studs can be finger-tight, or installed with a slight )about 8-10 ft-lb) preload, depending on the stud maker's recommendation.  One important thing to note is that you must NEVER install cylinder head studs using a threadlocking compound (Loctite, etc.).  The reason: anaerobic thread locking compound tends to expand when it cures. If a fastener location is very close to a cylinder wall, this can result in a cracked cylinder wall! Ross Racing Engines prefers to apply JB Weld to the stud's lower threads that engage into the block. This locks the studs in position (preventing back-out during nut loosening when heads are routinely removed, as in a race engine application), and, if any holes are open to water, this also serves as an excellent sealer. If the studs need to be removed down the road, an application of heat will aid in popping them loose.

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ARP conveniently provides female hex pockets at the top of their studs, which greatly aids in both installation and removal.

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I'm using a complete arsenal of ARP fasteners throughout the course of this build. Wherever possible/practical, I chose stainless steel fasteners the majority of fastener locations that will be visible upon final assembly.

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Our cylinder heads are made by Kaufman Racing Equipment. This is their D-port alunimum head, fully CNC machined, with 85cc chambers.

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Combustion chambers are CNC machined to provide exactly 85cc in each chamber. While Kaufman offers both unfinished and fully assembled heads, I opted for unfinished versions. The guides must be finish-sized for our valve stems, and seats our valves. We'll run 2.11" intakes and 1.77" exhaust valves.

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Kaufman Racing specializes in Pontiac engines and components (they only deal with Pontiac power). They design and manufacture their own cylinder heads (various versions for street to pro racing), and their own blocks (both iron and aluminum, and even billet machined aluminum). If you're dealing with a bigblock Chief, kaufman is one of the "go-to" outfits.

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The camshaft and lifter kit I chose is a hydraulic steel roller cam and roller lifters from Comp Cams. Valve lift (with our 1.5:1 rockers) is 0.520" intake and 0.540" exhaust. Duration @ 0.050" is 236/242. Lobe center is 110 degrees. The projected power band is 2200-6000 RPM. This stick should provide a healthy chop, ideal for a muscle-bound street machine.

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Remember that a steel camshaft requires the use of a compatible distributor gear. A bronze gear or a new-generation polymer or other compatible specialty gear is suggested. I'll provide further details on distributor gear selection in an upcoming installment of this project series.

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The Comp cams steel camshaft is a true work of art. Granted, steel cams cost a bit more as opposed to a cast cam, but steel provides superior strength/ridigity and more consistent valvetrain action, especially when high valve spring pressures are involved.

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The Comp Cams hydraulic roller lifters feature heavy-duty trunions that are designed to withstand high spring pressures and sustained high-RPM abuse.

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My connecting rods are forged steel H-beam units from Scat. By using an aftermarket performance crankshaft with 2.200" rod journals, this allows the use of bigblock Chevy rods, which are more commonly available, and available in a greater variety of lengths. These rods feature a center-to-center length of 6.700".

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Scat rods are manufactured with a high degree of precision. I haven't weighed these rods yet (This will be done during crank balancing), but based on all of my previous experience with Scat rods, there will be no need to perform weight corrections. Traditionally, their rod small ends always match, as well as the big ends.

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The Scat rods feature bushed pin bores for a floating pin fit.

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The Scat rods feature high-strength  8740 12-point rod bolts. Each end (nead and shank tip) feature recessed dimples, which accommodate the use of a rod bolt stretch gauge during rod bolt tightening. I'll provide details on tightening rod bolt via torque or stretch during the assembly phase of this series.

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The wet sump oil pump is a high-pressure unit from Melling Select performance.

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I've opted to use a high-performance timing set from Melling Select Performance for this build. Gear-drive systems are available for the Pontiac, but I felt that for a street performance application, a gear-drive would likely be overkill. The crank gear is multi-keyed, allowing advance or retard of cam timing as desired.

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The Pontiac 455 block utilizes a timing cover that doubles as a water pump mount. Instead of trying to salvage a used cover, I opted for a new unit from EQ (Enginequest).

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A Fluidampr crank balancer will adorn the nose of the crankshaft. This heavy-duty unit is made in the USA, and features easy-to-read laser-etched timing marks.

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Spark distribution will be handled via an MSD Pro Billet distributor. No external ignition box is needed.

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Our intake manifold is a single-plane Hurricane unit from Professional Products.  A front water crossover is featured, as well as blank bungs at the base of the runners, if direct nitrous or fuel injectors are desired (these manifolds are also available already drilled and tapped for injection fittings).

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Our carb is an 850 cfm bright-dip-finish from Holley. This will perfectly suit our combination.

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These tasty satin-finish aluminum valve covers from PRW are lightweight sheet-metal-welded units, complete with stainless steel cap screws. I'm told that these are also available in fully polished versions, as well as black powdercoat.

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Our intake valves are custom pieces from Del West. Construction is lightweight titanium, with hard steel coating at the tips (so no need for lash caps), and a tough DLC coating over the entire valve. The head diameter is 2.110" and length is 5.100". The stems are 11/32" in diameter.

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The Del West titanium intake valves feature radiused lock grooves, which will require radiused locks. The reason for radiusing this groove is to reduce potential metal stress. Always pay attention to the style of lock grooves, to choose the correct type of locks.

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Our exhaust valves are stainless, by Ferrea. Head diameter is 1.77", and overall length os 5.100". Like the intakes, stem diameter is 11/32".

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Rockers are billet aluminum full-rollers from Harland Sharp. Ratio is 1.5:1. With our roller cam, we'll have an effective valve lift of 0.520" intake and 0.540" exhaust.

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Harland Sharp roller rockers feature hardened steel pushrod cup inserts, and heavy-duty pivot trunions and valve rollers. Harland Sharp always produces extremely high quality components.

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Our street slugger will need an alternator, so why not select the best? The Tuff Stuff 100-amp alternator is fully polished and chrome plated, and features a single-wire connection. Tuff Stuff outfitted ours with a chrome double-groove pulley and a bullet-nose accent pulley face.

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Tuff Stuff also offers all-new (not rebuilt) water pumps for the Pontiac big-block, like this polished and chromed unit.

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New aluminum water pumps are also available from PRW. This example is a polished unit.

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Our block is now fully machined. Next, I'll finish dressing and detailing the block exterior, test-assemble to check crank and rod clearances, disassemble and wash and apply final paint. Then it's time for final assembly. I'll walk you through every aspect of the build in upcoming installments of this special project series.

STAY TUNED FOR PART 2

In my next article (Part 2 of this series), I’ll discuss test-fitting (mock assembly) of the crankshaft, rods and pistons, to check for potential block clearancing (to accommodate the stroker crank). I’ll also discuss main, rod and cam bearing fit and clearance checks, rod sideplay checks, piston-to-deck and piston-to-bore clearance checks, along with piston ring gap checks.

MY PARTS LIST

BLOCK………………………..Original Pontiac 455 (core)

CRANKSHAFT……………….Forged, with 4.500” stroke, 455 mains and BBC rod pins

(brand to be announced)

CONN. RODS………………….Scat forged 6.700” BBC P/N 2-454-6700-2200

STEEL CENTER MAIN CAPS..Pro-gram Engineering P/N P455C

MAIN STUDS…………………ARP P/N 194-5601

HEAD STUDS…………………ARP P/N 190-4305

CYL. HEADS………………….Kaufman Racing aluminum D-port, 85cc CNC

CAMSHAFT/LIFTERS………..Comp Cams hyd. Roller P/N CL51-433-9

ROCKERS……………………..Harland Sharp alum. Rollers, P/N S6001 (1.5:1)

PISTONS……………………….JE forged aluminum (custom order)

TIMING GEARS……………….Melling Performance P/N 40408

OIL PUMP………………………Melling Performance P/N 10540

TIMING COVER……………….EQ (EngineQuest) P/N TC400N

INTAKE VALVES………………Del West titanium (custom order: 2.10” x 5.100”)

EXHAUST VALVES……………Ferrea stainless steel P/N F5144 (1.77” x 5.100”)

VALVE SPRINGS………………TBA

RETAINERS……………………TBA

VALVE LOCKS………………..TBA

BALANCER…………………….Fluidampr P/N 650401 (6-5/8”)

FLEXPLATE……………………PRW P/N 1845503

INTAKE MANIFOLD…………..Professional Products Hurricane P/N 56031

CARBURETOR…………………Holley P/N 0-82851 (850 cfm)

CARB. FEED……………………Earls –8, P/N AT101286ER

DISTRIBUTOR…………………MSD Pro Billet P/N 8563

SPARK PLUG WIRES………….MSD P/N 31179

LIFTER VALLEY COVER……..Kaufman Racing

GASKET SET            …………………...Mahle Victor FS3494J

MAIN BEARINGS……………...Mahle Clevite P/N MS667P

ROD BEARINGS……………….Mahle Clevite P/N CB743HN

CAM BEARINGS……………….Mahle Clevite P/N SH2925

VALVE COVERS……………….PRW aluminum, satin

OIL PAN…………………………TBA

WATER PUMP………………….Tuff Stuff 1475NA (chrome) or PRW 1445510

ALTERNATOR…………………Tuff Stuff, P/N 7139ABULL (100A, chrome)

OIL PAN STUDS……………….ARP 400-1902

INTAKE MANIFOLD BOLTS…ARP 494-2101

CARB STUDS…………………..ARP400-2403

TIMING COVER BOLTS……....ARP 490-1501

FUEL PUMP BOLTS…………...ARP 490-1601

THERMOSTAT BOLTS………..ARP 490-7401

DISTRIBUTOR STUD……….…ARP 490-1701

CAMSHAFT BOLT……………..ARP 190-1001

VALVE COVER STUDS………..ARP 400-7504

FLEXPLATE BOLTS…………....ARP 200-2904

CRANK BALANCER BOLT……ARP 190-2501

ASSEMBLY CHEMICALS……….Valco, ARP, Royal Purple

SUPPLIER DIRECTORY

ARP, INC.

1863 Eastman Ave.

Ventura, CA 93003

800-826-3045

www.arp-bolts.com

BIRCHWOOD AUTOMOTIVE GROUP

10205 Wooster Pike Rd.

Creston, OH 44217

330-435-6347

www.birchwoodautomotive.com

COMP CAMS

3406 Democrat Rd.

Memphis, TN 38118

800-999-0853

www.compcams.com

DEL WEST ENGINEERING

28128 W. Livingston Ave.

Valencia, CA 91355

800-990-2779

www.delwestusa.com

EARL'S PERFORMANCE PLUMBING

Holley Performance Products

P.O. Box 10360

Bowling Green, KY 42102

270-782-2900

www.holley.com

EQ (ENGINEQUEST)

2580 N. Commerce St.

North Las Vegas, NV 89030-3876

800-426-8771

www.enginequest.com

FERREA RACING COMPONENTS

2600 NW 55th Ct., Suite 234

Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309

888-733-2505

www.ferrea.com

FLUIDAMPR-HORSCHEL MOTORSPORTS

180 Zoar Valley Rd.

Springville, NY 14141

716-592-1000

www.fluidampr.com

FRAGOLA PERFORMANCE SYSTEMS

888 W. Queen St.

Southington, CT 06489

866-337-2739

www.fragolaperformancesystems.com

GOODSON TOOLS & SUPPLIES

156 Galewski Dr.

Winona, MN 55987

800-533-8010

www.goodson.com

HARLAND SHARP

19769 Progress Dr.

Strongsville, OH 44149

440-238-3260

www.harlandsharp.com

HOLLEY PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS

P.O. Box 10360

Bowling Green, KY 42102

270-782-2900

www.holley.com

JE PISTONS

15312 Connector lane

Huntington Beach, CA 92649

714-898-9763

www.jepistons.com

KAUFMAN RACING EQUIPMENT

22280 Temple Rd.

Glenmont, OH 44628

740-599-5000

www.krepower.com

LISTA INTERNATIONAL

106 Lowland St.

Holliston, MA 01746

800-722-3020

www.listaintl.com

MAHLE CLEVITE

1350 Eisenhower Place

Ann Arbor, MI 48108-3282

734-975-4777

www.engineparts.com

MAC TOOLS

505 N. Cleveland Ave.

Westerville, OH 43082

800-622-8665

www.mactools.com

MELLING SELECT PERFORMANCE

P.O. Box 1188

Jackson, MI 49204

517-787-8172

www.melling.com

MSD IGNITION

1490 Henry Brennan Dr.

El Paso, TX 79936-6805

915-857-5200

www.msdignition.com

PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTS

12705 S. Van Ness Ave.

Hawthorne, CA 90250

800-478-5441

www.professional-products.com

PRO-GRAM ENGINEERING CORP.

P.O. Box 472

Barberton, OH 44203

330-745-1004

www.pro-gram.com

PRW (PERFORMANCE RACING WAREHOUSE)

193 West Orangethorpe Ave.

Placentia, CA 92870

714-792-1000

www.performanceracingwarehouse.com

ROSS RACING ENGINES

1763 N. Main St.

Niles, OH 44446-1277

330-544-4466

www.rossracingengines.com

ROYAL PURPLE, LTD.

One Royal Purple Lane

Porter, TX 77365

888-382-6300

www.royalpurple.com

SCAT ENTERPRISES

1400 Kingsdale Ave.

Redondo Beach, CA 90278-3983

310-370-5501

www.scatcrankshafts.com

SNAP-ON TOOLS

2801 80th St.

Kenosha, WI 53143-5699

262-656-5200

www.snapon.com

SUMMIT RACING

P.O. Box 909

Akron, OH 44398-6177

800-230-3030

www.summitracing.com

TUFF STUFF PERFORMANCE ACCESSORIES

9004 Madison Ave.

Cleveland, OH 44102-2715

800-331-6562

www.tuffstuffperformance.com

VALCO CINCINNATI CP, INC.

411 Circle Freeway Dr.

Cincinnati, OH 45246-1284

800-788-3865

www.valco-cp.com

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