PROJECT 408 LS, PART 1

This build features a GM LS platform, bored and stroked to 408 CID, with a 4.0305” bore and 4.000” stroke. A few of the notable elements include adapting Gen 1 smallblock Chevy valve covers to LS heads and a conversion to carburetion, this time using a tunnel ram intake fitted with dual 4-barrel carbs. My core block was salvaged from an iron LQ9 6.0L engine. The LQ9 is an LS-platform that features a cast iron block as opposed to an aluminum block. The entire core was purchased for a mere $400. The only items maintained from the core was the block and the rear engine cover. All remaining components are new. The majority of pieces were sourced from the performance aftermarket. The only GM parts purchased include the front-mounted camshaft position sensor, crankshaft position sensor, water temperature sensor, oil pressure sensor, rear-mounted plastic oil relief “barbell,” threaded block plugs and plastic lifter trays.  

Our iron LQ9 core was a typical high-mileage, greasy, grimy rusty hulk. Upon teardown and inspection, the block proved to be very restorable, with no severe damage to cylinder bores, mains or decks.

The iron block version was selected based on two factors: the relatively low cost of an engine core and the ability to easily accommodate an overbore. Once the core was torn down to a bare block, the block was hot-tanked and jet washed and inspected for cracks. Luckily (although the original crank was roached) the block checked out fine, with no cracks and no evidence of ever having been re-machined. The original cylinder bores were sonic checked for wall thickness, which revealed a minimum of 0.244”, safely allowing us to overbore final-hone to 4.0305”. Wall thickness must be checked before investing time in machining, due to potential variation in wall thickness that commonly results from core shift on LS blocks. Prior to block machining, I spent way too many hours smoothing out the block exterior in an effort to prepare the block for paint. Using die grinders, deburring bits, Scotchbrite pads and abrasive wheels, the block was dressed by removing all factory casting flashings, high spots, pits, uneven surfaces, etc.  

Prior to installing the powder metal main caps, lightly file the sharp edges of the main bore mating areas.

Also be sure to eliminate the sharp edges at the thrust bearing front and rear faces of the cap.

With the main caps installed (with our ARP studs) and the main bore indexing bar in place, the block is ready to enter the CNC machine at Gressman Powersports.

The block is placed in the CNC machine with the main bore indexing bar resting on V blocks.

Scott Gressman readies the CNC machine for block indexing measurements.

A digital probe indexes the block location by noting the centerline of the main bore and the cam bore.

The digital probe then identifies the location of all cylinder bores. This information will be compared to design specifications regarding bore centerline location.

With all bores indexed and decks measured, we find that the OE block decks are out of the factory spec of 9.240" deck height. Deck height locations range from 9.2324 to 9.2386". As a result of this information, our decks were then cut to a height of 9.2300", with both decks parallel and square (all deck surfaces equidistant from the main bore centerline).

Once the bores were rough machined and decks cut, each cylinder bore top edge was lightly chamfer-cut on CNC.

Our cylinder bores were roughed-in on CNC at 4.025".

With the block placed on the honing machine, the new ARP head studs were installed (finger-tight).

With a used (pre-crushed) MLS head gasket and deck plate in place, the head stud nuts were tightened to 80 lb-ft (with ARP moly).

Cylinder bores were honed in three steps starting with 275-325 diamond stones, followed by 4 strokes with 500 stones to achieve 4.0305" finished bore diameters. This was followed by plateau finishing.

Plateau finishing was done with 4 stroke passes.

Plateau brushes create a more uniform bore surface finish by eliminating microscopic peaks while retaining oil-cling valleys (essentially "averaging out" the surface profile).  This provides superior ring seating from the very start of engine operation.

An initial main bore check revealed a fairly tight 2.750" bore diameter.

Scott align honed the main bore to a finished size of 2.7512". This would provide 0.002" of bearing clearance.

Scott final-check all main bores, verifying our finished 2.7512" diameter.

ORIGINAL LQ9 SPECIFICATIONS (6.0L/364 CID)

BORE……………………….4.000”

STROKE……………………3.622”

ROD LENGTH……………..6.098”

PISTON CD………………...1.331”

BLOCK DECK HEIGHT…..9.240”      

OUR FINISHED SPECS (408 CID)

BORE…………………….. 4.0305”

STROKE………………….  4.000”

ROD LENGTH……………6.125”

PISTON CD……………….1.115”

BLOCK DECK HEIGHT….9.230”    

RELOCATING THE CAM SENSOR

Depending on the version of LS block, the camshaft position sensor may be located at the rear or front of the block. Earlier versions feature the cam sensor at the top rear of the block. The cam sensor enters a hole in the boss just behind the top cover, with its O-ring sealing in a hole that can be seen (from the rear) above the rear engine cover. The block casting is open at this point and the lower mounting hole for the sensor is clearly visible. Later LS platforms feature the cam sensor in the front engine cover. Typically the rear cam sensor location is featured on engines where the crankshaft reluctor wheel has 24 teeth, while engines with 58-tooth reluctor wheels feature the cam sensor mounted in the front cover. Since I opted to go with a 58-tooth wheel on our Callies Compstar crank, I decided to relocate the cam sensor from the rear to the front. On a rear-mount cam sensor, the sensor picks up its cam position signal from a small reluctor ring on the rear of the cam (just ahead of the cam’s rear journal). All cams made for LS applications will feature this reluctor. When the cam sensor is located at the front, the signal reference for cam position is provided by reluctor bosses on the camshaft sprocket. Since I decided to locate the cam sensor up front, I needed to plug the OE cam sensor hole in the rear. Note that the upper hole (flush with the gasket surface of the top cover) does not need to be plugged, since it’s merely open to air underneath. The bottom hole (where the OE cam sensor seals in the block) is the hole that must be plugged to avoid a nasty oil leak. Luckily the diameter of the lower hole will neatly accommodate a ½” NPT thread. I tapped this hole at the outset, so that I wouldn’t forget once the block was clean and painted. During final assembly I installed a ½” NPT plug (featuring a female hex), with thread sealer applied. Leaving the top hole open provides a convenient access for a hex wrench.

BLOCK MACHINING

Our block was machined at Gressman Powersports in Fremont, Ohio. Gressman’s is one of my favorite shops. The block was bored and decked on Scott Gressman’s RMC CNC machine, which not only gets the job done in a hurry, but provides extreme precision and repeatability. Prior to mounting the block in the CNC machine, the main caps were dressed and installed. Note: Scott carefully filed all main cap edges (at bore mating surfaces and front & rear sides of the center (#3) thrust bearing surfaces before installing the caps. The factory leaves sharp burrs on these edges that can easily create bearing interference. Especially on the thrust bearing locations, these sharp edges can cause the thrust bearing to expand slightly, diminishing thrust clearance. Using a set of ARP main studs, the caps were clamped using 50 ft-lb on the inboard stud nuts, 60 ft-lb on outboard nuts and 20 ft-lb for the 8mm side bolts. With the block mounted to the CNC machine, the digital probe obtained reference points, including main and cam bore locations, cylinder bore locations and deck surfaces. Our decks should have had a height of 9.240”, but the factory spec is rarely accomplished in OE mass production. Our decks initially measured from 9.2324” to 9.2386” (during a multi-location probe check on the CNC). The right bank deck was a bit lower than the left deck, so both were cut to a finished height of 9.230” in order to make them both square and of equal distance from the crankshaft centerline. Based on our 4.000” stroke, 6.125” rods and 1.115” piston compression height, this will result in the pistons sticking out of the decks by 0.010” (compensated for by using 0.050” head gaskets). The cylinder bores, although spec’d at 4.000”, initially measured 3.9988” to 3.9997”, and were a tad off-center as compared to blueprint specs. Scott programmed the CNC cutter to open the bores up to a rough diameter of 4.025”, and corrected bore centerlines in the process (ah, the beauty of CNC machining!). Following the boring process, all cylinder top edges were then chamfered on CNC. Once the block was accurized, the cylinders were then honed on Scott’s Rottler HP5 honing machine. Deck plates (along with crushed MLS head gaskets) were installed to the decks using the ARP head stud kit, snugging all nuts to 80 ft-lbs. Cylinders were honed in three steps: honed-to-size (4.0305”) using 275-325 diamond stones with motor load of 25%; four strokes with 500 stones at 20% motor load; and four strokes with plateau brushes at 20% motor load. The main bore initially measured a fairly tight 2.750”, so Scott align-honed the mains to 2.7512”. This would theoretically provide about 0.002” of main bearing clearance, which would be closely checked during test fitting.    

PAINTING THE BLOCK

Once we returned the block to my shop, we tediously prepped and painted the block exterior.

This is a task that I always dread, simply due to the hours and finicky work involved. Of course, I could simply grab a rattle can of engine paint and spray the darned thing, but I always seem to get carried away. I spent a couple of days “smoothing” the block exterior, using a combination of die grinders with deburring bits, tapered and round sanding bits, barrel sanders, mini-belt sanders and die-grinder-driven Scotchbrite pads, in order to remove any factory casting flashings, bumps and irregularities. Instead of stopping at that point, we then applied a coat of heavy-build epoxy primer, to aid in filling any low spots. The primer was then hand sanded, starting with 180-grit, followed by 240-grit and finally 400-grit paper (no fingernails left). The LS blocks feature TONS of nooks and crannies, so this isn’t a fun job by any stretch. Although not perfect, I managed to achieve a point at which I decided that it was “good enough” (sometimes you simply have to slap yourself and face reality). The result: it definitely looks better than it did at the start, at a level that the factory never would have considered messing with. This was followed by an application of Dupont basecoat (a tasty “orange red” that simulates an old Chevy orange-red), topped off with a Dupont urethane clearcoat. In addition to the block, we also applied the same finish to the valley cover, front cover and rear cover. By the way, one of the reasons that I prefer not to use spray-can engine paint is the common formulas available today that feature “ceramic resins” (citing the Duplicolor line as an example). While it sprays fine, it’s sometimes really tough to do any follow-ups or touch-ups. While the can instructions tell you to apply within an hour, and if you wait longer, you can only re-apply after a 7-day curing period, it’s been my experience that this simply isn’t so. In the past, I’ve waited as long as a month after the first coat. As soon as I tried to apply another coat (overall or spot-touchups), the second coat sometimes immediately lifted and wrinkled. I just don’t trust the stuff in terms of re-coating. If you plan to simply apply one coat and leave it alone, it’s fine. But the recoating demons are simply too threatening for me. Once the block was painted (basecoat and clearcoat), I removed all masking and all plugs that protected threaded holes. After waiting one day, I then final-washed the block using HOT soapy water (hot water and Dawn dishwashing liquid), using my set of Goodson bore brushes to clean the cam bores, oil galleys, lifter bores and cylinder bores. I followed this by rinsing with hot water, followed by a final rinse with COLD water (this reduces/slows down surface rusting). Using compressed air, I blew the block dry, paying special attention to all threaded holes, all bores and all oil galleys. After carefully applying a thin oil to the decks, lifter bores, cam bores, cylinders and main saddles (to prevent surface oxidizing prior to final assembly), I moved the block into my clean engine assembly room. Even though the room is dust-free, the block was covered with a lint-free cover cloth. Oils on cylinder bores, main saddles, cam bores and lifter bores were then carefully removed with a lint-free cloth and fast-drying solvent prior to cam bearing and crank installation, etc. When prepping for final assembly, it’s vital to CLEAN all bore surfaces using a fast-evaporating solvent and CLEAN, LINT-FREE rags until no trace of contaminants are left (when the cylinder bores are clean, you should be able to wipe with a clean white rag and see no traces of anything on the rag. At this point, immediately prior to installing the rods and pistons, you can apply a wipe of clean engine oil to the cylinder walls.  

COMPONENT PREVIEW

Following is the host of components selected for this build. During the course of this article series, I'll provide details regarding all parts and procedures.  

Our Callies Compstar forged crank features a 4.000" stroke and is equipped with a 58-tooth reluctor wheel.

Our Callies Compstar forged H-beam rods feature a center-to-center length of 6.125".

The Comp Cams hydraulic roller camshaft features 0.624" lift (int & exh). Advertised duration is 293 int/301 exh, with duration at 0.050" of 243 int/251 exh. LSA is 114 degrees. The roller lifters are Comp's "short race" versions.

Our pistons feature JE's new asymmetrical design that provides a slight pin offset to optimize thrust. Our piston compression height is 1.115".  

Rod and main bearings are from Mahle-Clevite, featuring moly-graphite reduced friction coating.

The Melling crank-driven oil pump is adjustable for pressure.

ARP main and head studs are used in this build. Pictured here are the head studs.

Our Trick Flow cylinder heads (P/N 3061T001-C02) were supplied fully assembled. They feature 225cc intake port volume, 80cc exhaust port volume and 65cc combustion chambers. Valve angle is 13.5 degrees.

The BMP Warhawk heads, P/N 001-025250, were supplied bare. Intake port volume is 235cc and combustion chamber volume is 72cc. We played with both the Trick Flow heads and the Warhawk heads for the sake of comparison. The Warhawk heads were assembled with Manley stainless valves.

Our Mahle-Victor cylinder head gaskets feature MLS construction, along with a sealing coating. 

Harland Sharp's newest LS roller rockers feature a 1.7:1 ratio, chamfered edges for weight reduction, shaft-pairing for precision alignment, hardened steel stands and socket-head cap screws.

Holley's LS Hi-Ram intake manifold features a modular plenum, allowing the use of either a single or dual carb setup. Since I decided to go with a carbureted induction setup on this build, I pulled out the stops and decided to go for broke. Why? because I can. After all...an LS with a dual quad tunnel ram? Who could resist? 

The Holley 4150 series double-pumper carbs feature 600cfm. P/N 0-80801-RD.

The Cloyes timing set features an easily adjustable cam gear via a handy eccentric adjustment bushing. The oil pump drive gear and cam thrust bearing is included. Our set, P/N  9-3172A,   is suitable for use with our front-mounted camshaft position sensor and our 58-tooth crank reluctor. 

Comp Cams' new LS front engine cover is very well thought-out. It clears a double roller chain, includes a provision for mounting a bigblock Chevy adjustable timing pointer, and provides a camshaft position sensor mounting location. An eccentric aluminum adapter fits into the sensor hole and is sealed with a square-cut seal. For use with a stock-cam-height block, the sensor hole in the adapter is oriented at 6 o'clock. If using a raised-cam aftermarket block, the adapter's hole is placed at the 12-o'clock position. If a front-mount cam sensor is not used, a blank aluminum plug is provided to fill the sensor hole.

In addition to the use of ARP fasteners for select locations, I relied heavily on a selection of stainless steel bolts, SHCS, washers, nuts and studs from Totally Stainless. Each package is organized and clearly labeled. Totally Stainless offers a very wide range of styles and sizes for a multitude of applications.   

Since the LQ9 factory block does not feature a timing chain damper, we added one, using Trick Flow's cleverly designed damper kit. This bolts directly, using three cam retainer plate bolt locations. No drilling of the block is necessary. 

Our Fluidampr crankshaft damper/pulley features a 7.250" pulley diameter and is beautifully adorned with a bronze surface finish. The precision of Fluidampr balancers and pulleys is truly impressive. 

Why use a boring and ugly OE pan when the Holley LS oil pan is available? The trimmed-down and definitely-prettier-than-OE aluminum pan offers a direct bolt-on fit and includes a baffle, pickup tube/screen assembly, drain plug and necessary seals. Also included is a block-off adapter for the remote oil cooler provision if a cooler is not to be used.

Lingenfelter offers its billet aluminum oil cooler adapter, complete with gasket and mounting screws. This fitting also features a provision to accommodate an oil temperature gauge. Inlet and outlet fittings are AN -10. This unit bolts directly to the left side of the oil pan, directly above the oil filter boss.

Instead of using a boring OE serpentine belt tensioner, Comp Cams offers this lovely billet aluminum adjustable tensioner, equipped with a heavy-duty pulley bearing that will outlive any OE setup. 

Meziere offers a range of electric water pumps for the LS platform. Available finishes include polished, chrome plated, and anodized red, blue or black. For this build, I decided to go with a polished unit. As an option, they also offer pumps equipped with a free-wheeling idler pulley to ease serpentine belt layouts.

If, like most people, you hate the sight of a row of coilpacks mounted on the valve covers, here's a cool solution. Taylor-Vertex offers aluminum valve cover adapters. These bolt directly to the cylinder heads, using the existing threaded holes designed for the OE valve covers. With these adapters in place, simply bolt on a pair of early-generation smallblock Chevy valve covers of your choice. Of course, this requires relocating the coilpacks. As soon as my coils arrive from MSD, I'll mount them to the rear of the cylinder heads. The ability to use Gen 1 smallblock valve covers provides an LS engine with a cleaner "old school" vibe. 

I obtained a pair of relatively inexpensive polished cast aluminum smallblock Chevy covers from Summit, and had them powdercoated in a "silver splash" wrinkle finish, followed up by engraving by Innovators West.

M/E Wagner's billet PCV valve is adjustable for vacuum signal. We'll try this out during the engine dyno session.

When you convert an LS engine to run carbureted, you don;t need an onboard computer to control fuel, but you still need to control ignition. The MSD 6LS control module (and harness) makes this super easy. The 6LS box is compatible with 24-tooth crank reluctors, while the 6LS2 is required for 58-tooth reluctors.

STAY TUNED FOR THE 408LS PART 2 ARTICLE AS WE CONTINUE THE BUILD.      

WHILE THIS PROJECT WILL BE DETAILED IN A MULTI-PART ARTICLE SERIES, FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF ALL OF THE PARTS I USED FOR THE BUILD. I’LL INCLUDE THIS LIST IN EACH ARTICLE INSTALLMENT.  

OUR LS 408 PARTS LIST

ENGINE BLOCK……………..GM, 6.0L LQ9 Iron  

MAIN CAPS………………….OE PM (powdered metal) CAPS  

MAIN STUDS…………………..ARP, P/N 234-5608  

MAIN BEARINGS……………….MAHLE CLEVITE, P/N MS-2199HK  

ROD BEARINGS (UPPER)…………MAHLE CLEVITE, P/N CB-663HNK

ROD BEARINGS (LOWER)………..MAHLE CLEVITE, P/N CB-633HXK  

CAM BEARINGS………………………MAHLE CLEVITE, P/N SH-2125S  

CAM BEARING INSTALLER TOOL……..GOODSON, P/N CBT-300  

CRANKSHAFT………………CALLIES COMPSTAR 4.000” Stroke Compstar forged, 58-tooth reluctor, P/N AP031N-CS  

CONNECTING RODS………CALLIES, 6.125”, Compstar forged, P/N CSC6125 DS2A2AH  

PISTONS……………………….JE flat-top, FSR, Asymm, 4.030” bore, 1.115 CD, P/N 311979  

CYLINDER HEADS (BARE)……………BILL MITCHELL PRODUCTS WARHAWK, LS1, 235cc Int; 72cc chambers,  P/N 001-025250  

CYLINDER HEADS (ASSEMBLED)…….TRICK FLOW P/N TFS-3061T001-C02

THREADED BLOCK PLUGS (X3) 16mmX1.5……….GM, P/N 11588949  

THREADED BLOCK PLUG, 28mmX1.25…………….GM, P/N 12561663  

FRONT OIL GALLEY CUP PLUG……………………..GM, P/N 9427693  

REAR OIL GALLEY PLUG BARBELL (15mmX64mm)….GM, P/N 12573460  

CYL. HEAD DOWELS (X4)……………GM, PN 12570326  

OIL PRESSURE SENSOR…………GM, P/N 12616646  

WATER TEMP. SENSOR…………….GM, P/N 12608814  

CRANK POSITION SENSOR (FOR 58 TOOTH)……GM, P/N 12585546  

CARBURETORS (X2)……………..HOLLEY 4150, 600 cfm, P/N 0-80801-RD  

INTAKE MANIFOLD…………HOLLEY HI-RAM, P/N 300-226

INTAKE MANIFOLD TOP……HOLLEY P/N 300-216  

INTAKE MANIFOLD BOLTS (TO HEADS)……TOTALLY STAINLESS, 8mm X 1.25 X 80mm SHCS  

UPPER PLENUM TO INTAKE MANIFOLD BOLTS…. TOTALLY STAINLESS, 1/4X20 X ¾ SHCS  

CARBURETOR LINKAGE………HOLLEY, P/N 4022  

CARBURETOR VELOCITY STACKS…………..CP PERFORMANCE P/N 620-60445  

VELOCITY STACK STUD KIT……………ALLSTAR P/N 26056 (studs cut to length)  

VELOCITY STACK STUD NUTS………….CAM MOTION TOP SEAL (1/4X20 threads)  

RED 5/16” ROD ENDS (for main throttle shaft)…..QA1 P/N AMR5  

VACUUM FITTING FOR PCV…………EARL’S P/N 984206ERL  

VALVE COVER BREATHER……….SUMMIT RACING, P/N SUM-G3403  

VALVE COVER BREATHER GROMMET………..MOROSO P/N 68772  

PCV VALVE GROMMET……………….MOROSO P/N 68775  

OIL PUMP…………………….MELLING hi-volume, P/N 10296  

CRANKSHAFT DAMPER………………..FLUIDAMPR P/N 740111  

CRANKSHAFT DAMPER BOLT………..ARP P/N 234-2503  

CYLINDER HEAD STUDS……….ARP, P/N 234-4316  

EXHAUST HEADERS……………..HOOKER, black ceramic, P/N 2292-3HKR

HEADER FLANGE STUDS……….TOTALLY STAINLESS 8mm X 1.25 X 40mm  

CYLINDER HEAD GASKETS………MAHLE VICTOR, MLS, P/N 54445  

GASKET SET……………………..MAHLE VICTOR, P/N CS5975  

ENGINE PRE-OILER/PRESSURE UNIT……………..GOODSON, P/N EPL-120  

CAMSHAFT………(HYD. ROLLER)……………….COMP P/N 54-462-11  

PUSHRODS (5/16” X 7.500” X 0.080” WALL)……..COMP CAMS P/N 7957-16  

LIFTERS…(SHORT/RACE-HYD)………………..COMP P/N 15850-16  

LIFTER GUIDE TRAYS ………GM P/N 12595365 (GEN IV) OR 12551162 (GEN III) (EITHER STYLE FITS THE LQ9 BLOCK)

NOTE: DRILL OUTBOARD SIDES FOR BETTER OIL DRAIN  

INTAKE VALVES (FOR BMP HEADS)………..  2.080” X 5.300” X 5/16” BMP  P/N 702830RM  

EXHAUST VALVES (FOR BMP HEADS)…………………..1.600” X 5.300” X 5/16” BMP P/N 702715SD  

VALVE SPRING KIT (FOR BMP HEADS)………………………COMP 26926TS-KIT  

ROCKERS (rollers; 1.7:1 ratio)…………..HARLAND SHARP P/N SHLS17  

OIL PAN…………………………………….HOLLEY, cast aluminum, P/N 302-1  

OIL PAN BOLTS………………………….ARP, P/N 434-6902  

OIL FILTER…………………………….AC DELCO PF48 or equivalent  

TIMING SET………………………………CLOYES P/N 9-3172A  

CAM GEAR BOLTS……………………….ARP P/N 134-1003  

TFS TIMING CHAIN DAMPER (LS2 STYLE)……….TFS-30675540  

TFS TIMING CHAIN DAMPER ADAPTER…………..TFS-30675600  

CAMSHAFT RETAINER PLATE BOLTS…..ARP P/N 134-1002  

WATER PUMP……………………………MEZIERE P/N WP319U  

WATER PUMP WATERNECK…………..MEZIERE P/N WN0019U  

WATER PUMP BOLTS (6)……….TOTALLY STAINLESS 8mm X 1.25 X 115mm  

FRONT COVER (OE)…………………..GM, LS2 (w/cam sensor) GM P/N 12633906

FRONT COVER (COMP)…………………COMP CAMS P/N 5496  

FRONT COVER BOLTS………………….ARP P/N 434-1502  

REAR COVER……………………………..GM P/N 12633579 (P/N 12639250 KIT)  

REAR COVER BOLTS…………………….ARP P/N 434-1504  

VALLEY COVER……………..BIRCHWOOD, FABRICATED (0.250-thick aluminum)  

VALLEY COVER BOLTS (12)……….TOTALLY STAINLESS 8mm X 1.25 X 20mm  

ENGINE BLOCK PAINT………….CHEVY ORANGE-RED (Dupont base/clear)  

SPARK PLUGS………………………………….NGK 4177 or equivalent  

VALVE COVER ADAPTERS………………………TAYLOR/VERTEX, P/N 555701  

VALVE COVERS…………………………………..SUMMIT P/N SUM-G3302  

PCV VALVE………………………………..M/E WAGNER, billet adj., P/N  DF-17  

PCV VALVE HOSE……………………….. –6 black braided (w/shrink tube ends)  

OIL COOLER ADAPTER KIT……………….LINGENFELTER P/N L300025297  

STEAM HOLE FRONT FITTINGS (-4 AN)……………TFS-30600611  

STEAM HOLE REAR CAPS……………………………TFS-30600612  

FRONT STEAM PLUMBING………..Two –4 90-deg hose ends; two –4 straight hose ends, -4 T-fitting, -4 black braided hose  

FUEL LINES………………………………………….. 3/8” OD aluminum, fabricated  

FUEL LINE FITTINGS……………………. –6 tube nuts and ferrules  

FUEL MANIFOLD…………………..PETERSON, P/N 10-0071 (5-way –6AN/-10AN)  

FUEL MANIFOLD BRACKET……………..BIRCHWOOD (fabricated aluminum)  

37-DEGREE FLARING TOOL…………….FRAGOLA, P/N 900500  

IGNITION CONTROLLER………………..MSD P/N 6LS-2 (for 58-tooth reluctor)  

IGNITION COILS……………………………MSD P/N TO COME  

DIPSTICK ASSEMBLY……………………LOKAR P/N 5008